44 Birds Of Pennsylvania (And How To Spot Them!)

Birds Of Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania is home to a diverse and fascinating array of birds. From colorful songbirds to majestic raptors, there are almost 440 species of birds that call the state their home.

Whether you’re an experienced birder or just starting, here are 44 of the most common and unique bird species you can find in Pennsylvania and some tips on how to spot them.

1. Eastern Bluebird

Eastern Bluebird

Pennsylvania is home to a variety of bird species, including the Eastern Bluebird. With its vibrant blue feathers and cheerful song, this bird is a favorite among birdwatchers.

  • Wingspan: 9″ – 12″
  • Body Length: 6.3″ – 8.3″ (males), 5.5″ – 6.7″ (females)
  • Weight: 1.1 – 1.2 oz.
  • Species Name: Sialia sialis

What do Eastern Bluebirds look like? The male has a bright blue head, back, and wings, with a rusty-red breast and white belly. The female is less vibrant, with a duller blue back and wings, and a grayish breast. The most distinguished features of the Eastern Bluebird include its blue coloration, white belly, and short, straight bill.

Where and when can you find Eastern Bluebirds in Pennsylvania? They prefer open habitats such as fields, meadows, and golf courses. Look for them perched on fence posts or low branches. They can be found year-round in Pennsylvania, but are most active during the breeding season from March to August.

Eastern Bluebirds Range Map:

Eastern Bluebirds Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Eastern Bluebirds sound like? Their song is a series of musical warbles and trills, often described as sounding like “chur-lee, chur-loo.” They also have a soft, chattering call.

Eastern Bluebirds Song:

Credit: Christopher McPherson, XC638302. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/638302.

Eastern Bluebirds Call:

Thomas Magarian, XC545794. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/545794.

How can you attract Eastern Bluebirds to your backyard? Provide them with a nest box, as they are cavity nesters and will not build their own nests. They also enjoy mealworms and other insects, so consider putting out a feeder with live or dried mealworms.

The Eastern Bluebird is a beautiful and charming bird that can be found year-round in Pennsylvania. By knowing where and when to look, and how to attract them to your backyard, you can enjoy the sight and sound of these delightful birds.

2. Common Yellowthroat

Common Yellowthroat

The Common Yellowthroat is a small bird that can be found in Pennsylvania.

  • Wingspan: 5.9” – 7.5″
  • Body Length: 4.3” – 5.1” (males), 4.3” – 5.1” (females)
  • Weight: 0.3 – 0.3 oz 
  • Species Name: Geothlypis trichas

What do Common Yellowthroats look like? The male of the species has a black mask on its face, while the female has a yellow-green mask. The most distinguished feature of this bird is its bright yellow throat, which is where it gets its name.

Where and when can you find Common Yellowthroat in Pennsylvania? If you’re looking to spot a Common Yellowthroat in Pennsylvania, you’ll want to head to areas with dense shrubs and wetlands. Some specific locations to check out include the John Heinz National Wildlife Refuge and the Middle Creek Wildlife Management Area. The best time to spot this bird is during the breeding season, which is from May to August.

Common Yellowthroat Range Map:

Common Yellowthroat Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Common Yellowthroats sound like? The Common Yellowthroat has a distinctive song that can help bird watchers identify it. The male’s song is a series of “wichety-wichety-wichety” notes, while the female’s song is a softer “chit-chit-chit”.

Common Yellowthroat Song:

Credit: Naomi, XC559484. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/559484.

Common Yellowthroat Call:

Credit: Thomas Magarian, XC531272. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/531272.

How can you attract Common Yellowthroat to your backyard? If you want to attract Common Yellowthroats to your backyard, you can create a habitat with dense shrubs and provide a water source. They also enjoy insects, so planting flowers that attract insects can help bring them to your yard.

Overall, the Common Yellowthroat is a beautiful and unique bird that can be found in Pennsylvania. By knowing where and when to look, as well as what to listen for, bird watchers can have a better chance of spotting this elusive bird.

3. Bald Eagle

Magestic Bald Eagles

The Bald Eagle is a majestic bird that is a symbol of freedom and strength in the United States. In Pennsylvania, the Bald Eagle is a common sight, and bird watchers can easily spot them in the state’s many parks and nature reserves.

  • Wingspan: 5′ 6″ – 8′
  • Body Length: approx. 5′ 6” (males), 6′ 1″ (females)
  • Weight: 10 – 14 pounds
  • Species Name: Haliaeetus leucocephalus

What do Bald Eagles look like? The male and female of the species differ in size, with the female being larger. The most distinguished features of the Bald Eagle are its white head and tail feathers, dark brown body feathers, and yellow beak and feet. The male has a smaller head and beak than the female.

Where and when can you find Bald Eagles in Pennsylvania? To find Bald Eagles in Pennsylvania, head to areas near large bodies of water, such as rivers and lakes. They can also be found in forests and mountainous regions. The best time to spot them is during the winter months, as they tend to migrate to Pennsylvania during this time. Bald Eagles are active during the day and can be seen soaring high in the sky or perched on a tree branch.

Bald Eagles Range Map:

Bald Eagles Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Bald Eagles sound like? They have a high-pitched, whistling call that can be heard from a distance. They also make a variety of other sounds, including chirps and screams.

Bald Eagle Call:

Credit: Thomas Magarian, XC527378. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/527378.

How can you attract Bald Eagles to your backyard? To attract Bald Eagles to your backyard, provide a natural food source like small mammals or dead animal carcasses, a large water source such as kiddie pools for bathing and drinking, and tall trees like pines or oaks for nesting. You can also build an artificial nest using a tall pole and branches. Ensure a steady food supply, as eagles need 250 to 500g of food daily, and maintain a quiet environment, as eagles are sensitive to noise and disturbances. Be cautious, as eagles might prey on small domestic animals.

The Bald Eagle is a magnificent bird that can be easily spotted in Pennsylvania. With its distinctive features and soaring flight, it is a sight to behold for any bird-watching enthusiast.

4. Brown-headed Cowbird

Brown-headed Cowbird

The Brown-headed Cowbird is a common bird species found in Pennsylvania and is a year-round resident of the state.

  • Wingspan: 12” – 15”
  • Body Length: 7.5” – 8.7” (males), 6.3” – 7.9” (females)
  • Weight: 1.5 – 1.8 oz (males), 1.3 – 1.6 oz (females)
  • Species Name: Molothrus ater

What do Brown-headed Cowbirds look like? The Brown-headed Cowbird is a small, stocky bird with a short tail and a thick, conical bill. The male has a glossy black body and a brown head, while the female is a dull gray-brown color. The most distinguished feature of this bird is its habit of laying its eggs in the nests of other bird species, leaving the host bird to raise its young.

Where and when can you find Brown-headed Cowbirds in Pennsylvania? To spot the Brown-headed Cowbird in Pennsylvania, look for it in open fields, pastures, and woodland edges. They can also be found in suburban areas with bird feeders. The best time to find them is during the breeding season, which is from May to August.

Brown-headed Cowbirds Range Map:

Brown-headed Cowbirds Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Brown-headed Cowbirds sound like? The Brown-headed Cowbird has a distinctive call that sounds like a low-pitched, gurgling whistle.

Brown-headed Cowbirds Song:

Thomas Magarian, XC544971. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/544971.

Brown-headed Cowbirds Call:

Thomas Magarian, XC527674. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/527674.

How can you attract Brown-headed Cowbirds to your backyard? If you want to attract Brown-headed Cowbirds to your backyard, provide a mix of open areas and shrubs or trees for nesting. They also enjoy feeding on insects, so consider adding a bird bath or feeder with mealworms.

The Brown-headed Cowbird is a fascinating bird species to spot in Pennsylvania. With its unique nesting habits and distinctive call, it’s a bird that’s worth keeping an eye out for.

5. Yellow Warbler

Yellow Warbler

Pennsylvania is home to a variety of bird species, including the colorful Yellow Warbler. Both male and female Yellow Warblers are small but striking birds.

  • Wingspan: 6.5” – 8′
  • Body Length: 4.7” – 5.1” both sexes
  • Weight: 0.3 – 0.4 oz
  • Species Name: Setophaga petechia

What do Yellow Warblers look like? The male Yellow Warbler has a bright yellow head, chest, and belly, with rusty streaks on its sides. Its wings and tail are a duller yellow, and it has a black mask around its eyes. The female, on the other hand, has a more muted yellow color with a grayish head and faint streaks on its chest. Both sexes have thin, pointed bills and black legs.

Where and when can you find Yellow Warblers in Pennsylvania? These birds prefer to live in deciduous forests, shrubby areas, and wetlands. They can be found throughout the state during the breeding season, which is from May to August. Yellow Warblers are active during the day and can be spotted flitting through the trees or shrubs.

Yellow Warblers Range Map:

Yellow Warblers Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Yellow Warblers sound like? Their song is a series of high-pitched, sweet notes that sound like “sweet-sweet-sweet-I’m-so-sweet.” They also have a call that sounds like “chip.”

Yellow Warblers Song:

Carlos Gonzalez, XC563515. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/563515.

Yellow Warblers Call:

Paul Marvin, XC779092. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/779092.

How can you attract Yellow Warblers to your backyard? To attract Yellow Warblers to your backyard, plant a variety of trees, shrubs, and flowers like Sycamore, Pine tree, Elderberry, and Dogwood, which provide both shelter and food.

During their breeding season, offer suitable nesting materials such as moss and twigs. Setting up a suet feeder with peanut butter, insect suet, and mealworms, along with providing favorite foods like orange slices and grape jelly, can also be effective. Additionally, a birdbath or a small running fountain, especially in spring and summer, can attract these warblers by providing them with a place to drink and bathe.

The Yellow Warbler is a beautiful and lively bird that can be found throughout Pennsylvania during the breeding season.

6. Hairy Woodpecker

Hairy Woodpecker

Pennsylvania is home to a variety of bird species, including the Hairy Woodpecker. This bird is a year-round resident of the state and can be spotted in various habitats, from forests to suburban areas. Both male and female of the species have similar physical characteristics.

  • Wingspan: 13” – 16.1”
  • Body Length: 7.1” – 10.2”
  • Weight: 7.1 – 10.2 oz
  • Species Name: Leuconotopicus villosus

What do Hairy Woodpeckers look like? These birds have black and white feathers with a distinctive red patch on the back of their head. The male has a red patch that extends to the bill, while the female has a smaller red patch. They have a long, chisel-like bill and a stiff tail that helps them balance on trees. The most distinguished features of the Hairy Woodpecker are their long bill and the white stripes on their wings.

Where and when can you find Hairy Woodpeckers in Pennsylvania? To spot a Hairy Woodpecker in Pennsylvania, head to wooded areas or suburban neighborhoods with mature trees.

Hairy Woodpeckers Range Map:

Hairy Woodpeckers Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Hairy Woodpeckers sound like? They can be found year-round, but are more active during the day in the spring and summer months. Listen for their distinctive drumming sound, which is a series of rapid taps on a tree trunk.

Hairy Woodpeckers Song:

Bobby Wilcox, XC722854. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/722854.

Hairy Woodpeckers Call:

Ned Bohman, XC810091. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/810091.

How can you attract Hairy Woodpeckers to your backyard? To attract Hairy Woodpeckers to your backyard, provide a suet feeder and a birdhouse with a 1.5-inch entrance hole. They also enjoy feeding on insects, so avoid using pesticides in your yard. Planting native trees and shrubs can also provide a habitat for these birds.

The Hairy Woodpecker is a common sight in Pennsylvania and can be easily spotted with a little knowledge and patience. By providing a suitable habitat and food source, you can attract these beautiful birds to your backyard.

7. Tufted Titmouse

Tufted Titmouse

The Tufted Titmouse is a common bird species found in Pennsylvania. With its distinctive crest and black patch above its beak, it is easy to spot in the wild.

  • Wingspan: 7.9” – 10.2”
  • Body Length: 5.5” – 6.3” both sexes
  • Weight: Up to12 oz (males), up to 10 oz (females)
  • Species Name: Baeolophus bicolor

What do Tufted Titmouses look like? The male and female of the species look similar, with the male having slightly brighter colors. They have a gray back, white belly, and a black patch above their beak. Their most distinguished feature is their tufted crest, which is gray in color. They also have a short, stubby beak and black eyes.

Where and when can you find Tufted Titmouses in Pennsylvania? If you want to spot a Tufted Titmouse in Pennsylvania, head to wooded areas with plenty of trees and shrubs. They are especially found in oak-hickory forests. They are also known to visit bird feeders in residential areas. You can find them year-round, but they are most active during the day in the spring and summer months.

Tufted Titmouses Range Map:

Tufted Titmouses Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Tufted Titmouses sound like? Tufted Titmice are known for their distinctive call, which sounds like ” peter-peter-peter.”

Tufted Titmouses Song:

Aidan Place, XC542141. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/542141.

Tufted Titmouses Call:

Brian, XC376462. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/376462.

How can you attract Tufted Titmouses to your backyard? If you want to attract Tufted Titmice to your backyard, provide them with a variety of food options such as sunflower seeds, peanuts, and suet. They also prefer nesting boxes with a 1.25-inch entrance hole.

The Tufted Titmouse is a charming bird species that is easy to spot in Pennsylvania. With its distinctive crest and call, it is a favorite among bird watchers. By knowing where and when to find them, you can enjoy watching these birds in their natural habitat.

8. Red-winged Blackbird

Red-winged Blackbirds

The Red-winged Blackbird is a common sight in Pennsylvania, with its distinctive red and yellow shoulder patches making it easy to spot. This bird is found throughout the state, from the marshes of the Delaware River to the fields of the Allegheny Plateau.

  • Wingspan: 12′ – 16”
  • Body Length: 8.7” – 9.4” (males), 6.7” – 7.1” (females)
  • Weight: 1.1 – 2.7 oz
  • Species Name: Agelaius phoeniceus

What do Red-winged Blackbirds look like? The males are black with bright red and yellow shoulder patches, while the females are a streaky brown color with a paler breast. The most distinguishing feature of this bird is its red and yellow patches, which are used to attract mates and defend territory.

Where and when can you find Red-winged Blackbirds in Pennsylvania? To spot a Red-winged Blackbird in Pennsylvania, head to wetlands, marshes, and fields. They can be found year-round, but are most active during the breeding season from March to July. They are diurnal, meaning they are active during the day, and can often be seen perched on cattails or other tall vegetation.

Red-winged Blackbirds Range Map:

Red-winged Blackbirds Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Red-winged Blackbirds sound like? The males have a distinctive call, described as a “conk-la-ree” or “o-ka-lee”, which they use to attract mates and defend their territory. Females have a more subdued call, a series of churrs or chuckles.

Red-winged Blackbirds Song:

radrat, XC539884. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/539884.

Red-winged Blackbirds Call:

Richard E. Webster, XC814752. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/814752.

How can you attract Red-winged Blackbirds to your backyard? To attract Red-winged Blackbirds to your backyard, provide a mix of open space and tall vegetation, such as cattails or reeds. They are also attracted to bird feeders with sunflower seeds or suet.

9. Carolina Wren

Carolina Wren Pair

Pennsylvania is home to a variety of bird species, including the Carolina Wren. This small bird is a common sight in the state, and bird watchers can easily spot it in various locations.

  • Wingspan: Approx. 11.4”
  • Body Length:  4.7” – 5.5″ both sexes
  • Weight:  0.6 – 0.8 oz
  • Species Name: Thryothorus ludovicianus

Both male and female Carolina Wrens have similar physical characteristics, with the male being slightly larger.

What do Carolina Wrens look like? These birds have a reddish-brown back, a white belly, and a distinctive white eyebrow stripe. The male has a brighter and bolder coloration than the female. The Carolina Wren’s most distinguished feature is its loud and melodious song.

Where and when can you find Carolina Wrens in Pennsylvania? Carolina Wrens can be found in various habitats, including forests, woodlands, and suburban areas. They are active during the day and can be spotted year-round in Pennsylvania. However, they are more vocal during the breeding season, which occurs from March to August.

Carolina Wrens Range Map:

Carolina Wrens Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Carolina Wrens sound like? If you want to identify a Carolina Wren by its sound, listen for its loud and clear song, which sounds like “teakettle, teakettle, teakettle.”

Carolina Wrens Song:

Amanda, XC564895. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/564895.

Carolina Wrens Call:

Thomas Magarian, XC545775. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/545775.

How can you attract Carolina Wrens to your backyard? To attract Carolina Wrens to your backyard, hang bird feeders filled with suet, sunflower seeds, peanuts, and mealworms, and set up small nesting boxes at an appropriate height.

Provide a brush pile shelter for protection and to attract insects, a major food source for wrens. Keep cats away, as they pose a danger to these birds. In winter, offer a heated bird bath or one with a bubbler to prevent freezing. Set up dust baths for wrens to clean themselves. Lastly, planting pokeweed can attract wrens due to its berries, but be cautious as pokeweed is toxic to humans and pets.

The Carolina Wren is a beautiful and melodious bird that is easy to spot in Pennsylvania. By knowing its physical characteristics, where and when to find it, what it sounds like, and how to attract it to your backyard, you can enjoy watching these birds up close.

10. House Finch

House Finch

Pennsylvania is home to a variety of bird species, including the House Finch. The male House Finch is slightly larger than the female.

  • Wingspan: 8” – 10”
  • Body Length:  5” – 6” both sexes
  • Weight:  0.6 – 0.9 oz
  • Species Name: Haemorhous mexicanus

What do House Finches look like? The male House Finch has a red head and breast, brown-streaked back, and a forked tail. The female, on the other hand, has a plain brownish-gray body with thick, blurry streaks on the underparts. The most distinguished feature of the House Finch is its red head and breast.

Where and when can you find House Finches in Pennsylvania? House Finches can be found in a variety of habitats, including urban and suburban areas, parks, and gardens. They are most commonly seen during the spring and summer months.

House Finches Range Map:

House Finches Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do House Finches sound like? House Finches have a cheerful, warbling song that can be heard throughout the day. They also have a distinctive call that sounds like “cheep” or “chirp.”

House Finches Song:

Lance A. M. Benner, XC492812. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/492812.

House Finches Call:

Thomas Magarian, XC465793. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/465793.

How can you attract House Finches to your backyard? House Finches are attracted to bird feeders that contain sunflower seeds, thistle, and millet. They also enjoy drinking from bird baths.

The House Finch is a common sight in Pennsylvania and can be easily spotted in a variety of habitats. Their cheerful song and distinctive red head and breast make them a favorite among bird watchers.

11. Indigo Bunting

Pennsylvania is home to a variety of bird species, including the stunning Indigo Bunting. The male Indigo Bunting is a vibrant blue color, while the female is a more subdued brown.

  • Wingspan: 7” – 9”
  • Body Length:  4.5” – 5.1” both sexes
  • Weight:  0.4 – 0.6 oz
  • Species Name: Passerina cyanea

What do Indigo Buntings look like? The male Indigo Bunting is a striking blue color with black wings and tail, while the female is a brownish color with a blue tint on the wings and tail. The most distinguished features of the male Indigo Bunting are its bright blue color and its conical beak.

Where and when can you find Indigo Buntings in Pennsylvania? Indigo Buntings can be found in open woodlands, fields, and along roadsides. They are most commonly seen during the summer months, from May to August, and are active during the day.

Indigo Buntings Range Map:

Indigo Buntings Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Indigo Buntings sound like? The male Indigo Bunting has a distinctive, high-pitched song that sounds like “fire, fire, where, where, here, here, see it, see it.” The female has a similar but softer song.

Indigo Buntings Song:

David A. Brinkman, XC817717. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/817717.

Indigo Buntings Call:

Richard E. Webster, XC618828. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/618828.

How can you attract Indigo Buntings to your backyard? Indigo Buntings are attracted to sunflower seeds, millet, and nyjer seeds. Planting native shrubs and trees can also provide a habitat for these birds.

The Indigo Bunting is a beautiful bird that can be found in Pennsylvania during the summer months. With its vibrant blue color and distinctive song, it is a sight and sound to behold.

12. Turkey Vulture

Turkey Vultures

Pennsylvania is home to a variety of bird species, including the Turkey Vulture. This bird is a common sight in the state, and bird watchers can easily spot them in the wild.

  • Wingspan: 66.9” – 70.1”
  • Body Length:  24” – 32” both sexes
  • Weight:  approx. 48 oz
  • Species Name: Cathartes aura

What do Turkey Vultures Look Like? The Turkey Vulture has a bald red head and a dark brown body. The male and female of the species look similar, but the female is slightly larger. The most distinguished features of the Turkey Vulture are its bald head and its ability to soar for hours without flapping its wings.

Where and when can you find Turkey Vultures in Pennsylvania? Turkey Vultures can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and along highways. They are most commonly seen during the day, soaring high in the sky. They are also more prevalent in Pennsylvania during the spring and summer months.

Turkey Vultures Range Map:

Turkey Vultures Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Turkey Vultures Sound Like? The Turkey Vulture is a silent bird and does not make much noise. However, they do hiss and grunt when they feel threatened or are defending their territory.

Turkey Vultures Song:

Turkey Vultures Call:

Andrew Spencer, XC381486. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/381486.

How to Attract Turkey Vultures to Your Backyard? Attracting Turkey Vultures to your backyard is not typically recommended due to potential sanitary and legal issues. These birds, being scavengers, are naturally drawn to open landscapes and can be indirectly encouraged by maintaining such an environment. However, it’s crucial to avoid using harmful chemicals that could contaminate their food sources. Generally, it’s best to appreciate Turkey Vultures from a distance and in their natural habitat, rather than trying to attract them to residential areas, as this could disrupt their natural behavior and create health risks.

13. Northern Mockingbird

Northern Mockingbirds

The Northern Mockingbird is a common sight in Pennsylvania, and bird watchers can easily spot it in various locations. Both males and females of the species have similar physical characteristics.

  • Wingspan: 12” – 15”
  • Body Length:  8.3” – 10.2” both sexes
  • Weight:   1.6 – 2.0 oz
  • Species Name: Mimus polyglottos

What do Northern Mockingbirds look like? This bird has a grayish-brown back and wings, a white belly, and a long tail. Its most distinguished features are its white wing patches and its ability to mimic other bird songs. Male and female Northern Mockingbirds look alike, but males tend to be more vocal during breeding season.

Where and when can you find Northern Mockingbirds in Pennsylvania? To find the Northern Mockingbird in Pennsylvania, bird watchers should look for open habitats such as parks, gardens, and suburban areas. This bird can be seen year-round, but it is most active during the day. During the breeding season, which is from April to August, Northern Mockingbirds can be heard singing throughout the day and night.

Northern Mockingbirds Range Map:

Northern Mockingbirds Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Northern Mockingbirds sound like? This bird is known for its ability to mimic other bird songs and sounds. Its song is a series of phrases that are repeated several times. The song can last up to 20 minutes and can include imitations of other birds, car alarms, and even human whistles.

Northern Mockingbirds Song:

Ned Bohman, XC813943. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/813943.

Northern Mockingbirds Call:

Bobby Wilcox, XC806604. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/806604.

How to attract Northern Mockingbirds to your backyard? To attract Northern Mockingbirds to your backyard, provide a variety of food sources such as berry-producing plants (e.g., holly, mulberry, juniper) and chopped fruits in feeders.

Ensure a water source like a birdbath for drinking and bathing. Create shelter and nesting sites by planting dense shrubs and small trees, and minimize the use of pesticides to maintain a healthy insect population for them to feed on. These steps can create a welcoming environment for Northern Mockingbirds.

The Northern Mockingbird is a fascinating bird species that can be easily spotted in Pennsylvania. Its unique ability to mimic other bird songs and sounds makes it a favorite among bird watchers.

14. Song Sparrow

Song Sparrow

As a bird-watching enthusiast in Pennsylvania, one bird that you should keep an eye out for is the Song Sparrow. This bird is a common resident throughout the state, making it a great bird to spot for beginners and experienced bird watchers alike.

  • Wingspan: 7.1” – 10”
  • Body Length:  4.3” – 7.1” both sexes
  • Weight:   0.4 – 1.9 oz
  • Species Name: Melospiza melodia

What do Song Sparrows look like? The male has a brown back with dark streaks, a grayish head with a distinctive brown stripe through the eye, and a white belly with dark streaks. The female is similar in appearance but has a less distinct head pattern. The most distinguished features of the Song Sparrow are its streaked breast and its long, rounded tail.

Where and when can you find Song Sparrows in Pennsylvania? To spot a Song Sparrow in Pennsylvania, head to areas with dense vegetation such as shrubs, hedgerows, and brushy fields. They can also be found near water sources such as streams and ponds. The best time to spot them is during the breeding season, which is from April to August. They are active during the day and can be seen foraging for insects and seeds.

Song Sparrows Range Map:

Song Sparrows Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Song Sparrows sound like? If you’re having trouble spotting a Song Sparrow, try listening for its distinctive song. The male’s song is a series of clear, musical notes that sound like “maids, maids, maids, put on your tea kettle-ettle-ettle.”

Song Sparrows Song:

Thomas Magarian, XC540259. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/540259.

Song Sparrows Call:

Thomas Magarian, XC540254. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/540254.

How to attract Song Sparrows to your backyard? To attract Song Sparrows to your backyard, provide a mix of seeds, particularly millet, in feeders, as they mainly eat seeds along with insects. Ensure there’s a water source like a birdbath or a small pond for drinking and bathing. Create a suitable habitat with dense, low vegetation, such as native shrubs and thickets, for shelter and nesting. Additionally, minimizing the use of pesticides will help maintain a natural insect population, which can be an important food source for these birds.

15. Barn Swallow

Barn Swallow

Pennsylvania is home to the Barn Swallow which is a relatively common sight in the state.

  • Wingspan: 12.5” – 13.5”
  • Body Length: 5.9” – 7.5” both sexes
  • Weight: 0.6 – 0.7 oz
  • Species Name: Hirundo rustica

What do Barn Swallows look like? The male and female of the species have similar appearances, with a blue back, rusty throat, and a long, forked tail. The most distinguished features of the Barn Swallow include its pointed wings and deeply forked tail.

Where and when can you find Barn Swallows in Pennsylvania? To find Barn Swallows in Pennsylvania, bird watchers should look for them in open habitats such as fields, meadows, and wetlands. They can also be found nesting on buildings and bridges. The best time to spot them is during the summer months, as they migrate to the state during this time.

Barn Swallows Range Map:

Barn Swallows Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Barn Swallows sound like? Barn Swallows produce a variety of distinctive sounds. Both males and females sing a “twitter-warble” song, especially during courtship and egg-laying periods. This song consists of a series of continuous warbling sounds followed by up to a dozen rapid, mechanical-sounding whirrs, lasting from 4 to 20 seconds, often introduced and followed by a chirp.

Barn Swallows Song:

Bo Shunqi 薄顺奇, XC843377. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/843377.

Barn Swallows Call:

Branislav Oblučar, XC823306. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/823306.

How to attract Barn Swallows to your backyard? To attract Barn Swallows to your backyard, install nesting boxes, cups, or platforms under eaves or in sheltered areas, and provide water sources for drinking, bathing, and nest building. Avoid using insecticides to maintain a healthy insect population for them to feed on.

Allow areas of your yard to grow wild with grass and weeds to attract insects, and avoid planting too many trees as swallows prefer open spaces for flying. Creating mud puddles will provide the necessary mud for nest building. If you have old nests on your property, leave them undisturbed, as swallows often return to the same nests each year. Additionally, leaving windows open in outbuildings can provide additional sheltered nesting spots.

The Barn Swallow is a fascinating bird species that can be easily spotted in Pennsylvania. With its distinctive appearance and chirping sound, it is a delight for bird watchers to observe.

16. House Sparrow

House Sparrows

The House Sparrow is a common sight in urban and suburban areas throughout Pennsylvania.

  • Wingspan:  7.5” – 9.8”
  • Body Length: 5.9” – 6.7” both sexes
  • Weight: 0.9 – 1.1 oz
  • Species Name: Passer domesticus

What do House Sparrows look like? These birds have brown and gray feathers with black markings on their wings and backs. Males have a black bib on their throats, while females have a plain grayish-brown chest. The most distinguished features of the House Sparrow include their plump bodies, short tails, and conical beaks.

Where and when can you find House Sparrows in Pennsylvania? If you’re looking to spot House Sparrows in Pennsylvania, you’ll want to head to urban and suburban areas with plenty of buildings and structures. These birds are often found near human habitation, such as parks, gardens, and city streets. You can spot them year-round, but they are most active during the day.

House Sparrows Range Map:

House Sparrows Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do House Sparrows sound like? House Sparrows produce a variety of sounds. Their primary song is relatively simple, consisting of a series of monotonous chirping sounds, characterized by shrill “cheep” and “chirrup” notes. This song is mainly sung by male House Sparrows throughout the year, used to announce their possession of a nest and to attract females. Females rarely use this song, typically only to attract a new mate after losing one.

House Sparrows Song:

Jack Berteau, XC841356. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/841356.

House Sparrows Call:

Joost van Bruggen, XC843321. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/843321.

In addition to their primary song, both male and female House Sparrows make single “cheep” notes, which indicate submissiveness in flocks or are part of courting and copulation behavior. Females also make a short chattering sound when chasing off other females or when their mate approaches

How to attract House Sparrows to your backyard? To attract House Sparrows to your backyard, set up bird feeders with a variety of seeds and grains such as sunflower seeds, millet, cracked corn, oats, and buckwheat, along with suet and insects for protein.

Providing clean water sources for drinking and bathing is also crucial. Create a safe and inviting habitat by planting shrubs and bushes for shelter and potential nesting sites, and maintain a clean, predator-free environment. These measures will make your backyard appealing to House Sparrows​

The House Sparrow is a common and easily recognizable bird species in Pennsylvania. With a little knowledge and patience, you can spot these birds in the wild and even attract them to your own backyard.

17. Tree Swallow

Tree Swallows

With a wingspan of 12-14 inches, a weight of 0.6-0.9 oz, and a body length of 5-6 inches, both male and female Tree Swallows are relatively small in size and a common sight in Pennsylvania.

  • Wingspan:  12” – 14”
  • Body Length: 4.7” – 5.9” both sexes
  • Weight: 0.6 – 0.9 oz 
  • Species Name: Tachycineta bicolor

What do Tree Swallows look like? The male and female of the species look similar, with iridescent blue-green feathers on their backs and white feathers on their bellies. The most distinguished features of the Tree Swallow include their forked tails and their habit of flying in a quick, darting motion.

Where and when can you find Tree Swallows in Pennsylvania? If you’re looking to spot a Tree Swallow in Pennsylvania, head to open areas near water, such as marshes, ponds, and lakes. They can also be found in fields and meadows. Tree Swallows are most commonly seen in Pennsylvania during the spring and summer months.

Tree Swallows Range Map:

Tree Swallows Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Tree Swallows sound like? Tree Swallows produce a variety of sounds. Their songs are composed of three distinct sounds—a chirp, a whine, and a gurgle—which they mix and match in various patterns. Both male and female Tree Swallows sing these songs. Additionally, they use these chirps and gurgles to call each other, especially between mates. Apart from these, Tree Swallows are known to make aggressive chatters, shrieking alarm calls, harsh distress calls, and amorous ticking sounds. They also have a defensive behavior where they snap their bills while perched to keep other individuals away​.

Tree Swallows Song:

Thomas Magarian, XC354703. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/354703.

Tree Swallows Call:

Ted Floyd, XC423481. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/423481.

How to attract Tree Swallows to your backyard? To attract Tree Swallows to your backyard, create an open and clean environment with plenty of flying space, avoiding tall structures or dense foliage. Install nest boxes in open areas, and provide natural nesting materials like grass trimmings and feathers nearby. Since Tree Swallows mainly eat insects, maintain a healthy insect population by avoiding pesticides. Offer clean, moving water sources for drinking and bathing, such as a fountain or waterfall. During the breeding season, provide calcium-rich foods like rinsed eggshells and fish bones to support their dietary needs

The Tree Swallow is a common sight in Pennsylvania during the spring and summer months. Look for them near water in open areas, listen for their high-pitched chirping, and consider putting up a nest box to attract them to your backyard.

18. Red-bellied Woodpecker

Red-bellied Woodpecker

The Red-bellied Woodpecker is a common sight in Pennsylvania, with its distinctive red head and black and white striped back. This bird is a year-round resident in the state, making it a great bird to spot no matter the season.

  • Wingspan:  15” – 18”
  • Body Length: 9” – 10.5” both sexes
  • Weight: 2.0 – 3.2 oz 
  • Species Name: Melanerpes carolinus

What do Red-bellied Woodpeckers look like? The male and female of the species look similar, with the male having a slightly larger red patch on its head. The most distinguished features of this bird include its red head, black and white striped back, and a pale belly with a red tinge.

Where and when can you find Red-bellied Woodpeckers in Pennsylvania? To spot a Red-bellied Woodpecker in Pennsylvania, head to wooded areas such as forests, parks, and even suburban areas with mature trees. These birds can be found year-round, but are most active during the day.

Red-bellied Woodpeckers Range Map:

Red-bellied Woodpeckers Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Red-bellied Woodpeckers sound like? Their call is a “rolling kwirr or churr,” and they also make a “nasal mew” sound.

Red-bellied Woodpeckers Song:

Brian Hendrix, XC563618. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/563618.

Red-bellied Woodpeckers Call:

Christopher McPherson, XC599842. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/599842.

How to attract Red-bellied Woodpeckers to your backyard? If you want to attract Red-bellied Woodpeckers to your backyard, try putting up a suet feeder or offering peanuts. They also enjoy nesting in dead trees, so consider leaving a dead tree or snag in your yard if it is safe to do so.

Overall, the Red-bellied Woodpecker is a beautiful and common bird in Pennsylvania that is easy to spot and enjoy year-round.

19. American Crow

American Crows

The American Crow is a relatively common sight in Pennsylvania. Both male and female American Crows have similar physical characteristics.

  • Wingspan:  33” – 39”
  • Body Length: 16” – 21” both sexes
  • Weight: 11.2 – 21.9 oz 
  • Species Name: Corvus brachyrhynchos

What do American Crows Look Like? The American Crow has a distinctive black plumage with a glossy sheen. Its bill is thick and black, and its legs are also black. The male and female American Crows look alike, but the female is slightly smaller. The most distinguished features of this bird are its loud cawing calls and its intelligence.

Where and when to find American Crows in Pennsylvania? American Crows can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, fields, and urban areas. They are common throughout Pennsylvania and can be seen year-round. These birds are active during the day and can be spotted foraging for food on the ground or in trees.

American Crows Range Map:

American Crows Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do American Crows Sound Like? American Crows are known for their diverse vocalizations, with more than 20 different calls. The most recognizable sound they make is the familiar harsh “caw”, which varies in quality and length, serving different purposes.

American Crows Song:

American Crows Call:

Thomas Magarian, XC543337. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/543337.

American crows can produce a range of sounds, including combinations like “Crooockk”, “Cool”, and “Caw-uh Caw Caw”. Interestingly, American Crows can also imitate the calls of other birds. Young American Crows, while still immature, emit a higher-pitched, nasal call that can resemble the sound of a Fish Crow. Additionally, American Crows are known to give various calls and alert calls, particularly to rally others to mob predators.

How to attract American Crows to your backyard? If you want to attract American Crows to your backyard, you can provide them with food and water. These birds will eat a variety of foods, including seeds, nuts, fruit, and insects. You can also provide them with a birdbath or other source of water.

20. Black-capped Chickadee

Black-capped Chickadees

The small Black-capped Chickadeebird is a common sight in the state, and bird watchers can easily spot them in the right locations. Both males and females of the species have similar measurements.

  • Wingspan:  6” – 8”
  • Body Length: 4.5” – 6” both sexes
  • Weight: approx. 0.5 oz 
  • Species Name: Poecile atricapillus

What do Black-capped Chickadees look like? These birds have a distinctive black cap and bib, with white cheeks and a gray back. The male and female of the species look similar, but the male’s bib is usually larger. Other distinguished features include their small size and round body shape.

Where and when to find Black-capped Chickadees in Pennsylvania? To find Black-capped Chickadees in Pennsylvania, bird watchers should look for them in deciduous forests, parks, and suburban areas with trees. These birds can be found year-round, but are more active during the day and in the winter months.

Black-capped Chickadees Range Map:

Black-capped Chickadees
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Black-capped Chickadees sound like? These birds have a distinctive “chick-a-dee-dee-dee” call, which is often used to communicate with other members of their flock.

Black-capped Chickadees Song:

Thomas Magarian, XC420409. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/420409.

Black-capped Chickadees Call:

Thomas Magarian, XC436795. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/436795.

How to attract Black-capped Chickadees to your backyard? To attract Black-capped Chickadees to your backyard, provide them with a bird feeder filled with sunflower seeds or suet. These birds are also attracted to nesting boxes, so consider installing one in your yard.

21. Eastern Phoebe

Black-capped Chickadee

Pennsylvania is home to the Eastern Phoebe which can be found throughout the state.

  • Wingspan:  10.2” – 11”
  • Body Length: 5.5” – 6.7” both sexes
  • Weight: 0.6 – 0.7 oz  
  • Species Name: Sayornis phoebe

What do Eastern Phoebes look like? These birds have a dark head, back, and tail, with a white belly and throat. The most distinguished feature of the Eastern Phoebe is its habit of wagging its tail up and down. Male and female Eastern Phoebes look similar, but the male may have a slightly darker head.

Where and when to find Eastern Phoebes in Pennsylvania? If you’re looking to spot an Eastern Phoebe in Pennsylvania, head to open woodlands, fields, or near water sources. These birds can be found year-round in the state, but are most commonly seen in the spring and summer months. Look for them during the day, as they are not active at night.

Eastern Phoebes Range Map:

Eastern Phoebes Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Eastern Phoebes sound like? The Eastern Phoebe has a distinctive call that sounds like “fee-bee.” This call is often heard before the bird is seen. If you’re having trouble spotting an Eastern Phoebe, listen for its call to help guide you.

Eastern Phoebes Song:

Ken Burton, XC566096. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/566096.

Eastern Phoebes Call:

Chase M, XC566104. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/566104.

How to attract Eastern Phoebes to your backyard? To attract Eastern Phoebes to your backyard, provide nesting sites such as birdhouses or platforms. These birds prefer open areas with nearby water sources. Planting native trees and shrubs can also help attract them to your yard.

The Eastern Phoebe is a common sight in Pennsylvania and can be easily spotted with a little knowledge and patience. Keep an eye out for their distinctive tail wag and listen for their “fee-bee” call to help guide you. With a little effort, you can enjoy the beauty of these small birds in your own backyard.

22. Purple Martin

Purple Martin

The stunning Purple Martin can be found in Pennsylvania.

  • Wingspan:  15.3” – 16.1”
  • Body Length: 7.5” – 7.9” both sexes
  • Weight: 1.6 – 2.1 oz  
  • Species Name: Progne subis

What do Purple Martins look like? The male has a dark, glossy blue-black plumage, while the female has a lighter, duller plumage with a grayish-brown head and wings. The most distinguished feature of the Purple Martin is its forked tail.

Where and when to find Purple Martins in Pennsylvania? If you want to spot a Purple Martin in Pennsylvania, you can find them in open areas near water, such as lakes, rivers, and wetlands. They prefer to nest in man-made birdhouses, so keep an eye out for those in parks and residential areas. You can spot them during the summer months, as they migrate to Pennsylvania from South America in late March and leave in early August.

Purple Martins Range Map:

Purple Martins Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Purple Martins sound like? Purple Martins are known for their distinct and varied vocalizations. Their calls include a rich mix of churring, bubbling, and buzzy notes, often combined with soft clicks in a repeated pattern.

Purple Martins Song:

Lance A. M. Benner, XC379335. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/379335.

Purple Martins Call:

Whitney Neufeld-Kaiser, XC784046. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/784046.

These birds are particularly vocal and can produce a loud, warbling churr along with other melodious calls. Males are known to sing warbling churring songs that incorporate trills and clicking sounds. These songs are usually performed while the birds are perched near their nest sites, although they can also sing in flight.

In addition to these sounds, Purple Martins are noted for their noisy chirping, which can include sounds like chortling, rattling, and croaking. The male Martins are especially noted for their varied melodies, such as the guttural courtship song, a song for the rising sun, and a song for the setting of the breeding season​​​​​​​​​​.

How to attract Purple Martins to your backyard? If you want to attract Purple Martins to your backyard, you can install a birdhouse specifically designed for them. Make sure to place it in an open area near water and away from trees, as they prefer to nest in open spaces. You can also play their calls to attract them.

The Purple Martin is a beautiful bird that can be spotted in Pennsylvania during the summer months. Keep an eye out for their distinctive forked tail and listen for their chirping calls. If you want to attract them to your backyard, install a birdhouse and play their calls.

23. Red-tailed Hawk

Red-tailed Hawk

The Red-tailed Hawk is a common sight in Pennsylvania, soaring high in the sky with its distinctive red tail feathers. This bird of prey can be found throughout the state, from the forests of the Poconos to the farmlands of Lancaster County.

  • Wingspan:  44.9” – 52.4” (males), 44.9” – 52.4” (females)
  • Body Length:  17.7” – 22.1” (males), 19.7” – 25.6” (females)
  • Weight: 24.3 – 45.9 oz (males),  31.8 – 51.5 oz (females)
  • Species Name: Buteo jamaicensis

What do Red-tailed Hawks look like? These birds have a brownish-red back and wings, with a white chest and belly. Their most distinguishing feature is their red tail feathers, which are visible when they are in flight. Females are larger than males and have a more prominent white chest.

Where and when to find Red-tailed Hawks in Pennsylvania? To spot a Red-tailed Hawk in Pennsylvania, head to open areas such as fields, meadows, and along highways. They can also be found in wooded areas and near water sources. These birds are active during the day and can be seen year-round in Pennsylvania.

Red-tailed Hawks Range Map:

Red-tailed Hawks Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Red-tailed Hawks sound like? Red-tailed Hawks are known for their distinctive vocalizations. Their call is described as a hoarse screech lasting two to three seconds, which descends in pitch. This screech can be phonetically represented as “kree-eee-ar” or “tsee-eeee-arr”. Interestingly, the sound of the Red-tailed Hawk is often used in movies to represent a bald eagle, which actually has a weaker squeal. Juvenile Red-tailed Hawks produce a different sound, more akin to a squeal.

Red-tailed Hawks Song:

Red-tailed Hawks Call:

John Baur, XC449110. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/449110.

Additionally, these birds are most vocal and loud when they feel angry or threatened, such as when a rival hawk or potential danger enters their territory. During courtship, both male and female Red-tailed Hawks soar in high circles and emit shrill cries. Males may perform spectacular aerial maneuvers, flying high and then diving repeatedly, and may even catch prey and pass it to the female in flight

How to attract Red-tailed Hawks to your backyard? To attract Red-tailed Hawks to your backyard, provide a habitat that caters to their needs for food, water, shelter, and nesting. This includes having bird feeders to attract smaller birds that serve as prey, avoiding the use of rodenticides and insecticides, and providing large bird baths for hawks to bathe and cool down.

Your yard should have big, mature trees for shelter and nesting, and maintaining a natural, quiet environment is essential. Be cautious about the safety of small pets, as hawks may mistake them for prey. While these measures can make your yard more inviting to hawks, their actual presence will depend on local environmental conditions and prey availability.

In conclusion, the Red-tailed Hawk is a majestic bird of prey that can be found throughout Pennsylvania. With its distinctive red tail feathers and screeching call, it is a sight to behold for bird watchers and nature enthusiasts alike.

24. Common Grackle

Common Grackle

You can find the Common Crackle in Pennsylvania. Both the male and female of the species are similar in size.

  • Wingspan:  14” – 18”
  • Body Length:  11” – 13”
  • Weight:  2.6 – 5.0 oz
  • Species Name: Quiscalus quiscula

What do Common Grackles look like? The male has a glossy black head and body, while the female is a duller brown color. Both have yellow eyes and a long, keel-shaped tail. Their most distinguished feature is their sharp, pointed bill.

Where and when to find Common Grackles in Pennsylvania? If you’re looking to spot a Common Grackle in Pennsylvania, head to open fields, meadows, or suburban areas with trees. They can be found year-round, but are most active during the day in the spring and summer months.

Common Grackles Range Map:

Common Grackles Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Common Grackles sound like? Their call is a harsh, metallic “chack” or “chuck” sound. They also make a variety of other noises, including whistles and croaks.

Common Grackles Song:

Paul Driver, XC786565. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/786565.

Common Grackles Call:

Richard E. Webster, XC816277. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/816277.

How to attract Common Grackles to your backyard? To attract Common Grackles to your backyard, provide a mix of open space and trees for them to perch on. They also enjoy feeding on insects, so consider putting out mealworms or suet.

The Common Grackle is a fascinating bird to observe in Pennsylvania. With its distinctive appearance and unique calls, it’s sure to catch the eye (and ear) of any bird-watching enthusiast.

25. Osprey

Osprey

With a wingspan of up to 6 feet, a weight of 3-4 pounds, and a body length of 21-24 inches, the Osprey is a sight to behold. The male and female of the species are similar in appearance, with the female being slightly larger.

  • Wingspan:  59.1” – 70.9”
  • Body Length:  22” – 25”
  • Weight:  49.4 – 70.5 oz
  • Species Name: Pandion haliaetus

What do Ospreys look like? These birds have a distinctive appearance, with brown and white feathers, a white head, and a hooked beak. Their most distinguished feature is their ability to dive into water to catch fish, which they do with incredible precision.

Where and when to find Ospreys in Pennsylvania? If you’re looking to spot an Osprey in Pennsylvania, head to the coast or near large bodies of water such as lakes and rivers. They can be found in a variety of habitats, including marshes, estuaries, and even man-made structures such as cell towers. The best time to spot them is during the summer months, when they are most active.

Ospreys Range Map:

Ospreys Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Ospreys sound like? If you’re having trouble spotting an Osprey, listen for their distinctive call. They make a series of high-pitched whistles and chirps, which can help you locate them even if they are hidden from view.

Ospreys Song:

JAYRSON ARAUJO DE OLIVEIRA, XC838049. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/838049.

Ospreys Call:

Lars Edenius, XC799597. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/799597.

How to attract Ospreys to your backyard? To attract Ospreys to your backyard, consider installing a nesting platform near a body of water. These birds are known to return to the same nesting site year after year, so providing a safe and comfortable place for them to raise their young can be a great way to observe them up close.

Overall, the Osprey is a fascinating bird to observe in Pennsylvania. With their impressive hunting skills and distinctive appearance, they are sure to capture the attention of any bird watching enthusiast.

26. White-breasted Nuthatch

White-breasted Nuthatch

The White-breasted Nuthatch bird is a year-round resident in Pennsylvania and can be spotted in a variety of habitats, including deciduous and mixed forests, parks, and suburban areas.

  • Wingspan:  7.9” – 10.6”
  • Body Length:  5.1” – 5.5” 
  • Weight:  0.6 – 1.1 oz
  • Species Name: Sitta carolinensis

What do White-breasted Nuthatches look like? These birds have a blue-gray back, a white face and underparts, and a black cap on their head. The male and female of the species look similar, but males have a slightly longer bill. The most distinguished feature of the White-breasted Nuthatch is its habit of walking headfirst down tree trunks and branches.

Where and when to find White-breasted Nuthatches in Pennsylvania? To spot a White-breasted Nuthatch in Pennsylvania, look for them in wooded areas with mature trees. They are most active during the day and can be seen year-round. In the winter, they may visit bird feeders for suet or peanuts.

White-breasted Nuthatches Range Map:

White-breasted Nuthatches Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What does a White-breasted Nuthatch sound like? These birds have a distinctive nasal call that sounds like “”yank yank.”” They also make a soft “”whit”” sound.

White-breasted Nuthatch Song:

Daniel Parker, XC475398. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/475398.

White-breasted Nuthatch Call:

Lance A. M. Benner, XC409948. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/409948.

How to attract White-breasted Nuthatches to your backyard? To attract White-breasted Nuthatches to your backyard, provide a suet feeder or offer peanuts in a mesh feeder. These birds are also attracted to mature trees and wooded areas, so planting native trees and shrubs can help create a suitable habitat.

27. White-throated Sparrow

White-throated Sparrow

The White-throated Sparrow is a common bird species found in Pennsylvania. This bird is a year-round resident in the state and can be spotted in various habitats such as forests, woodlands, and suburban areas.

  • Wingspan:  9.1”
  • Body Length:  5.9” – 7.5” 
  • Weight:  0.8 – 1.1  oz
  • Species Name: Zonotrichia albicollis

What do White-throated Sparrows look like? These birds have a distinctive white throat and a black and white striped head. The male has a brighter white throat than the female. They also have a brownish-gray back and wings with white stripes.

Where and when to Find White-throated Sparrows in Pennsylvania? To spot a White-throated Sparrow in Pennsylvania, head to wooded areas or suburban gardens. They can be seen all year round, but are more commonly seen during the winter months. They are active during the day and can be heard singing in the early morning.

White-throated Sparrows Range Map:

White-throated Sparrows Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do White-throated Sparrows sound like? The White-throated Sparrow has a distinctive song that sounds like “”Oh sweet Canada Canada Canada””. This song can be heard during the breeding season and is used to attract mates.

White-throated Sparrows Song:

Sue Riffe, XC844264. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/844264.

White-throated Sparrows Call:

Valerie Heemstra, XC821692. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/821692.

How to attract White-throated Sparrows to your backyard? To attract White-throated Sparrows to your backyard, provide them with a mix of seeds such as millet, sunflower seeds, and cracked corn. They also enjoy suet and mealworms. Make sure to provide them with a source of water as well.

The White-throated Sparrow is a beautiful bird species that can be easily spotted in Pennsylvania. With its distinctive white throat and black and white striped head, it is a joy to watch and listen to.

28. American Goldfinch

American Goldfinch

The American Goldfinch is a common sight in Pennsylvania, especially during the summer months. This bird is a resident of the state and can be found in a variety of habitats, including fields, meadows, and gardens.

  • Wingspan: 7.5” – 8.7”
  • Body Length:  4.3” – 5.5” 
  • Weight:  0.4 – 0.7 oz
  • Species Name: Spinus tristis

What do American Goldfinches look like? The male American Goldfinch is easily recognizable with its bright yellow body and black wings with white markings. During the winter months, the male’s feathers become duller, and the black wings turn brown. The female American Goldfinch has a duller yellow body with black wings and white markings. The most distinguished features of the American Goldfinch are its conical bill and its undulating flight pattern.

Where and when to find American Goldfinches in Pennsylvania? American Goldfinches can be found in Pennsylvania throughout the year, but they are most commonly seen during the summer months. They prefer open habitats such as fields, meadows, and gardens. They are also attracted to thistle and sunflower seeds, making bird feeders a great place to spot them. American Goldfinches are active during the day and can be seen flying in an undulating pattern.

American Goldfinches Range Map:

American Goldfinches Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do American Goldfinches sound like? The American Goldfinch has a distinctive, high-pitched song that sounds like “”per-chick-o-ree.”” They also have a call that sounds like “”potato-chip.”” These sounds can be heard throughout the day, especially during the breeding season.

American Goldfinches Song:

David Liebl, XC571646. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/571646.

American Goldfinches Call:

John Baur, XC537161. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/537161.

How to attract American Goldfinches to your backyard? To attract American Goldfinches to your backyard, focus on planting seed-producing plants like asters, coneflowers, sunflowers, thistles, and native vegetation such as thistles and milkweed, which provide both food and a natural habitat. Offer their preferred seeds, particularly Nyjer and hulled sunflower seeds, in tube feeders, which are ideal for these smaller birds to feed without competition from larger species. Additionally, providing a fresh water source for drinking and bathing is essential. These steps create a welcoming environment that caters to the goldfinches’ dietary and habitat preferences, making your backyard an attractive destination for these colorful birds.

29. Blue Jay

Blue Jay

If you’re a bird watching enthusiast in Pennsylvania, you’ve likely spotted the Blue Jay. This bird is a common sight in the state, and it’s easy to see why. With its striking blue feathers and distinctive crest, the Blue Jay is a beautiful bird that’s hard to miss.

  • Wingspan: 13” – 17′
  • Body Length:  9” – 12” 
  • Weight:  2.5 – 3.5 oz
  • Species Name: Cyanocitta cristata

What do Blue Jays look like? The Blue Jay is a medium-sized bird with blue feathers on its head, back, wings, and tail. Its underparts are white, and it has a black collar around its neck. The male and female of the species look similar, but the male has a slightly larger crest. The most distinguishing feature of the Blue Jay is its crest, which it can raise or lower depending on its mood.

Where and when to find Blue Jays in Pennsylvania? Blue Jays can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, parks, and suburban areas. They are year-round residents in Pennsylvania, so you can spot them at any time of the year. They are most active during the day, and you’re most likely to see them in the morning or late afternoon.

Blue Jays Range Map:

Blue Jays Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Blue Jays sound like? Blue Jays are known for their loud, distinctive calls. They have a variety of calls, including a harsh “”jay-jay”” call and a softer, more musical whistle. They also make a variety of other sounds, including rattles, clicks, and gurgles.

Blue Jays Song:

Meena Haribal, XC638324. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/638324.

Blue Jays Call:

Sue Riffe, XC841327. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/841327.

How to attract Blue Jays to your backyard? To attract Blue Jays to your backyard, offer a variety of their favorite foods such as roasted and unsalted nuts, whole peanuts, seeds, grains, corn, mealworms, fruits, and berries in platform or blue jay-friendly feeders. Providing a consistent water source, especially in winter, is crucial, and a bird bath with a broad basin, enhanced with features like drippers or wigglers, can be particularly appealing to these birds. Additionally, creating a natural habitat with fruit-bearing shrubs and nut-bearing trees, along with maintaining organic gardens and leaf litter, will make your yard more inviting. Keeping pets indoors can also help in making the environment safe and attractive for Blue Jays.

30. Belted Kingfisher

Belted Kingfisher

The Belted Kingfisher is a common bird species found in Pennsylvania. This bird is known for its unique appearance and interesting behaviors. If you’re a bird watching enthusiast, spotting this bird can be a thrilling experience.

  • Wingspan: 19” – 23”
  • Body Length:  11” – 14” 
  • Weight:  4 – 6.3 oz
  • Species Name: Megaceryle alcyon

The male and female of the species are similar in appearance, but the female has an additional rusty-colored band on her belly.

What do Belted Kingfishers look like? This bird has a distinctive appearance with a large head, shaggy crest, and long, thick bill. They have a blue-gray back, white underparts, and a blue-gray breast band. The most distinguished features of this bird are its large head and long bill.

Where and when can you find the Belted Kingfisher in Pennsylvania? These birds can be found near bodies of water such as rivers, streams, and ponds. They prefer habitats with steep banks and overhanging trees. The best time to spot them is during the breeding season, which is from May to August. They are most active during the day and can be seen perched on branches near the water’s edge.

Belted Kingfishers Range Map:

Belted Kingfishers Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Belted Kingfishers sound like? This bird has a distinctive rattling call that sounds like a loud, harsh laugh.

Belted Kingfishers Song:

William Whitehead, XC503144. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/503144.

Belted Kingfishers Call:

Isaí López, XC784913. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/784913.

How can you attract Belted Kingfishers to your backyard? Attracting Belted Kingfishers to your backyard primarily involves creating a water feature, such as a pond or a small water container, as these birds are adept fish hunters and are drawn to water bodies with suitable fishing spots. Mimicking their natural habitats, which include rivers, lakes, streams, and coastal areas, by providing perches near water can further encourage their presence. Additionally, offering nesting opportunities, either through areas for tunnel-style nests or designated nesting boxes, and providing food like raw meat on an open table, can also make your backyard more appealing to Belted Kingfishers. However, it’s important to remember that these are wild birds and may not consistently visit residential areas.

31. Dark-eyed Junco

Dark-eyed Junco

The Dark-eyed Junco is a commonly found in Pennsylvania.

  • Wingspan: 7.1” – 9.8”
  • Body Length:  5.5” – 6.3” 
  • Weight:   0.6 – 1.1 oz
  • Species Name: Junco hyemalis

The Dark-eyed Junco has a wingspan of 7.5-9.8 inches, a weight of 0.6-1.1 oz, and a body length of 5.1-6.7 inches. The male and female of the species have similar physical characteristics, with the male having a darker head and back. (source: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Dark-eyed_Junco/id)

What do Dark-eyed Juncos look like? This bird has a gray head, neck, and breast, with a white belly and a dark gray or brown back. Its most distinguished feature is its white outer tail feathers, which are visible when it flies. The male has a darker head and back than the female.

Where and when can you find Dark-eyed Juncos in Pennsylvania? This bird can be found in various habitats, including forests, parks, and suburban areas. It is a year-round resident in the state, but its population may increase during the winter months. You can spot this bird during the day, especially in the morning and late afternoon.

Dark-eyed Juncos Range Map:

Dark-eyed Juncos Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Dark-eyed Juncos sound like? The Dark-eyed Junco exhibits a range of vocalizations, with males known for their even, musical trill of 7-23 notes lasting up to 2 seconds, similar to the Chipping Sparrow and Pine Warbler, and audible from several hundred feet away. Both sexes also sing a quieter series of whistles, trills, and warbles, akin to the sound of an American Goldfinch, but with a limited range of about 40 feet. Additionally, they emit a high, short chip note used during flight and foraging, a sharp “kew” sound indicating aggression, and a fast, twittering call during altercations or when startled. These varied sounds serve different purposes, from attracting mates to signaling aggression or encouraging group movement.

Dark-eyed Juncos Song:

John Baur, XC537140. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/537140.

Dark-eyed Juncos Call:

Lance A. M. Benner, XC502158. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/502158.

How can you attract Dark-eyed Juncos to your backyard? To attract Dark-eyed Juncos to your backyard, create a safe environment by providing dense shrubs and trees for shelter, and ensure the area is free of predators like cats.

Offer their preferred foods such as hulled sunflowers, white proso millet, and cracked corn, ideally scattered on the ground or in low-platform feeders. Plant native seed-bearing plants like chickweed and sunflowers, and allow them to go to seed in the fall for natural foraging.

Include a bird bath for fresh water, particularly heated ones in winter. Providing shelter and nesting materials such as moss, fine grasses, and pine needles in low bushes or trees can encourage nesting. Managing potential threats from predators like stray and feral cats is also crucial for creating a safe and attractive environment for these birds.

32. Cedar Waxwing

Cedar Waxwing

The stunning Cedar Waxwing is one bird that can be found in Pennsylvania. With its unique appearance and beautiful song, this bird is a favorite among bird watchers in the state.

  • Wingspan: 8.7” – 11.8”
  • Body Length:  6” – 7” 
  • Weight: 1.1 oz
  • Species Name: Bombycilla cedrorum

What do Cedar Waxwings look like? These birds have a sleek, brownish-gray body with a black mask around their eyes and a yellow-tipped tail. The male and female of the species look similar, but the male has a slightly larger mask. The most distinguished feature of the Cedar Waxwing is its bright red wax-like tips on its secondary feathers.

Where and when can you find the Cedar Waxwings in Pennsylvania? If you’re looking to spot a Cedar Waxwing in Pennsylvania, you’ll want to head to areas with fruit trees, such as apple orchards or berry bushes. These birds are also known to frequent parks and gardens. You can find them in Pennsylvania year-round, but they are most commonly seen in the summer and fall.

Cedar Waxwings Range Map:

Cedar Waxwings Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Cedar Waxwings sound like? Cedar Waxwings are known for their distinctive vocalizations, characterized by high-pitched, thin whistles or soft trills used for communication within the flock, courtship, and alerting to food or danger. Their calls, include a high-pitched, piercing sound when perched or taking off, and are distinct in their varying pitch, frequency, and duration. Common calls are very high-pitched whistles and buzzy trills, often represented as “see” or “sree,” and last about half a second. Additionally, they produce a series of soft, warbling “cheee” sounds for communication among themselves. These varied calls are unique and easily distinguishable once familiarized.

Cedar Waxwings Song:

Manuel Grosselet, XC466822. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/466822.

Cedar Waxwings Call:

Richard E. Webster, XC616703. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/616703.

How can you attract the Cedar Waxwings to your backyard? If you want to attract Cedar Waxwings to your backyard, try planting fruit trees or berry bushes. These birds also enjoy drinking from bird baths and fountains.

The Cedar Waxwing is a beautiful and unique bird that can be found throughout Pennsylvania. With its distinctive appearance and sweet song, it’s no wonder why bird watchers love spotting this species.

33. Downy Woodpecker

Downy Woodpecker

The Downy Woodpecker is a small and common bird in Pennsylvania that birdwatches can easily spot in various locations.

  • Wingspan: 10” – 12”
  • Body Length:  5.5” – 7.1” 
  • Weight: 0.7 – 1.0 oz
  • Species Name: Picoides pubescens

Both male and female Downy Woodpeckers have similar physical characteristics, but males have a small red patch on the back of their heads.

What do Downy Woodpeckers look like? These birds have black and white feathers, with a white belly and black wings. Their most distinguished feature is their small size, which makes them easy to spot.

Where and when can you find Downy Woodpeckers in Pennsylvania? If you want to find Downy Woodpeckers in Pennsylvania, look for them in wooded areas, parks, and even in your own backyard. These birds are active during the day and can be seen year-round. However, they are more active in the morning and tend to be quieter in the afternoon.

Downy Woodpeckers Range Map:

Downy Woodpeckers Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Downy Woodpeckers sound like? If you want to identify a Downy Woodpecker by sound, listen for their high-pitched “pik” or “tik” calls. They also have a drumming sound that they use to communicate with other birds.

Downy Woodpeckers Song:

Thomas Magarian, XC531293. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/531293.

Downy Woodpeckers Call:

Thomas Magarian, XC546154. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/546154.

How can you attract Downy Woodpeckers to your backyard? To attract Downy Woodpeckers to your backyard, provide them with suet feeders and birdhouses. These birds also enjoy feeding on insects, so planting trees and shrubs that attract insects can also help.

34. Chipping Sparrow

Chipping Sparrow

A plethora of bird species call Pennsylvania their home, one of which is the Chipping Sparrow. This diminutive avian creature is a frequent sight throughout the state, and it’s relatively easy for bird enthusiasts to observe in numerous locales.

  • Wingspan: 8” – 9”
  • Body Length:  4.7” – 5.9” 
  • Weight: 0.4 – 0.6 oz
  • Species Name: Spizella passerina

What do Chipping Sparrow look like? The male has a rusty cap and a black line through its eye, while the female has a duller cap and lacks the black line. Both have a grayish-brown back and a white belly. The most distinguished feature of this bird is its rusty cap.

Where and when can you find Chipping Sparrows in Pennsylvania? To find the Chipping Sparrow in Pennsylvania, bird watchers can look for it in open woodlands, parks, and gardens. They are most commonly seen during the breeding season, which is from May to August. They are active during the day and can be spotted foraging for food on the ground.

Chipping Sparrows Range Map:

Chipping Sparrows Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Chipping Sparrows sound like? Their song is a series of dry, trilled chips that sound like a sewing machine.

Chipping Sparrows Song:

Manuel Oudard, XC837829. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/837829.

Chipping Sparrows Call:

Russ Wigh, XC691765. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/691765.

How can you attract Chipping Sparrows to your backyard? To attract the Chipping Sparrow to your backyard, provide them with a variety of seeds, including sunflower, millet, and nyjer. They also enjoy insects, so having a variety of plants in your garden can attract them as well.

35. House Wren

House Wren

The House Wren is commonly found in Pennsylvania and is a year-round resident.

  • Wingspan: 5.9”
  • Body Length:  4.3” – 5.1” 
  • Weight: 0.3 – 0.4 oz
  • Species Name: Troglodytes aedon

What do House Wrens look like? Male and female House Wrens look similar, with brownish-gray feathers and a white belly. The male has a slightly brighter coloration and a louder song. The most distinguished feature of this bird is its small size and round body.

Where and when to find House Wrens in Pennsylvania? House Wrens prefer habitats with dense vegetation, such as shrubs, gardens, and woodlands. They can be found throughout Pennsylvania, but are more common in the eastern part of the state. They are active during the day and can be seen foraging for insects in the early morning and late afternoon. They are also known to sing loudly during the breeding season, which occurs from May to August.

House Wrens Range Map:

House Wrens Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do House Wrens sound like? House Wrens have a loud and melodious song, which is often described as bubbly or chattery. They also make a harsh scolding call when they feel threatened.

House Wrens Song:

Bernabe Lopez-Lanus, XC551550. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/551550.

House Wrens Call:

Lauren Harter, XC554509. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/554509.

How to attract House Wrens to your backyard? To attract House Wrens to your backyard, provide them with nesting boxes or natural cavities in trees. They prefer small, enclosed spaces with a small entrance hole. You can also offer them food by putting out mealworms or suet cakes.

36. Gray Catbird

Gray Catbird

The Gray Catbird is a common sight in Pennsylvania, and bird watchers can easily spot it in various locations.

  • Wingspan: 8.7” – 11.8”
  • Body Length:  8.3” – 9.4” 
  • Weight: 0.8 – 2.0 oz
  • Species Name: Dumetella carolinensis

What do Gray Catbirds look like? This bird has a slate-gray body, a black cap, and a long, black tail. Its most distinguished feature is the rusty patch under its tail. The male and female of the species look alike, but the male may have a slightly darker cap.

Where and when can you find Gray Catbirds in Pennsylvania? This bird prefers habitats such as shrubby areas, gardens, and parks. It can be found in the state from May to October, during the breeding season. The Gray Catbird is active during the day and can be seen foraging for insects and berries.

Gray Catbirds Range Map:

Gray Catbirds Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Gray Catbird sound like? This bird is known for its distinctive mewing call, which sounds like a cat’s meow. It also has a variety of other calls, including a harsh “chack” and a musical whistle.

Gray Catbird Song:

Erik Ost, XC559775. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/559775.

Gray Catbird Call:

Manuel Grosselet, XC843606. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/843606.

How can you attract Gray Catbirds to your backyard? Planting shrubs and trees, providing a water source, and offering berries and insects can all help attract this bird to your home.

37. European Starling

European Starling

The European Starling is a common bird species found in Pennsylvania is is relatively easy to spot.

  • Wingspan: 12.2” – 15.8”
  • Body Length:  7.9” – 9.1” 
  • Weight: 2.1 – 3.4 oz
  • Species Name: Sturnus vulgaris

What do European Starlings look like? The male and female of the species look similar, with glossy black feathers and iridescent purple and green highlights. During breeding season, the male’s feathers become more speckled and he develops a yellow beak. The most distinguished feature of the European Starling is its ability to mimic other bird calls and even human speech.

Where and when can you find European Starlings in Pennsylvania? To spot a European Starling in Pennsylvania, look for them in open fields, farmlands, and urban areas. They can be found year-round, but are most active during the day in the spring and summer months.

European Starlings Range Map:

European Starlings Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do European Starlings sound like? If you’re having trouble spotting a European Starling, listen for their calls. They have a variety of calls, including a high-pitched whistle and a chattering sound.

European Starlings Song:

Simon Oberhofer, XC835255. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/835255.

European Starlings Call:

Sonothèque ADVL, XC823665. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/823665.

How can you attract European Starlings to your backyard? To attract European Starlings to your backyard, provide a bird feeder with suet or mealworms. They also enjoy nesting in birdhouses, so consider putting one up in your yard.

38. Black Vulture

Black Vulture

With a wingspan of up to 6 feet, a weight of 3-5 pounds, and a body length of 25-32 inches, the Black Vulture is a sight to behold. Both male and female Black Vultures have similar physical characteristics, with the females being slightly larger.

  • Wingspan: 53.9” – 59.1”
  • Body Length:  23.6” – 26.8” 
  • Weight: 56.4 – 77.6 oz
  • Species Name: Coragyps atratus

What do Black Vultures look like? These birds have black feathers and a bald, grayish-black head. Their most distinguished feature is their hooked beak, which is used to tear apart carrion. Male and female Black Vultures look alike, but juveniles have a dark head and a pale beak.

Where and when can you find Black Vultures in Pennsylvania? If you’re looking to spot a Black Vulture in Pennsylvania, you’re in luck. These birds can be found throughout the state, particularly in open areas such as fields, pastures, and along highways. They are most active during the day and can be seen year-round.

Black Vultures Range Map:

Black Vultures Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Black Vultures sound like? These birds are relatively quiet, but they do make a hissing or grunting noise when communicating with each other.

Black Vultures Call:

GABRIEL LEITE, XC327288. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/327288.

How can you attract Black Vultures to your backyard? If you want to attract Black Vultures to your backyard, the best way to do so is by providing a food source. However, it’s important to note that these birds are scavengers and should not be fed directly. Instead, consider setting up a compost pile or leaving out carrion for them to find on their own.

39. Northern Flicker

Northern Flicker

The Northern Flicker is a common sight in Pennsylvania, and bird watchers can easily spot it in various locations.

  • Wingspan: 16.5” – 21.5”
  • Body Length:  11” – 12.2” 
  • Weight: 3.9 – 5.6  oz
  • Species Name: Colaptes auratus

What do Northern Flickers look like? This bird has a brown back with black bars, a spotted belly, and a red patch on the back of its head. Its most distinguished features are its long bill and its white rump patch, which is visible when it flies.

Where and when can you find Northern Flickers in Pennsylvania? The Northern Flicker can be found in various habitats, including forests, woodlands, and suburban areas. It is most commonly seen during the day, and it is present in Pennsylvania throughout the year. During the breeding season, which is from April to July, the Northern Flicker can be heard drumming on trees to attract mates.

Northern Flickers Range Map:

Northern Flickers Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Northern Flickers sound like? This bird has a distinctive call that sounds like ” wicka-wicka-wicka.”

Northern Flickers Song:

David A. Brinkman, XC807485. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/807485.

Northern Flickers Call:

Scott Olmstead, XC776026. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/776026.

How can you attract Northern Flickers to your backyard? If you want to attract Northern Flickers to your backyard, you can provide them with a variety of food sources, including suet, mealworms, and sunflower seeds. You can also provide them with a nesting box, as they are cavity nesters.

40. Eastern Kingbird

Eastern Kingbird

The diverse birdlife of Pennsylvania encompasses numerous species, one of which is the Eastern Kingbird.

This avian inhabitant is frequently seen across the state, making it a fairly easy spot for birdwatching enthusiasts in specific locales.

  • Wingspan: 13” – 15”
  • Body Length:  7.5” – 9.1”
  • Weight: 1.2 – 1.9  oz
  • Species Name: Tyrannus tyrannus

What do Eastern Kingbirds look like? These birds have a dark head and back, with a white underbelly. They also have a distinctive white band on the tip of their tail. Male and female Eastern Kingbirds look similar, but males have a slightly larger bill. The most distinguished features of the Eastern Kingbird are its white tail band and its habit of perching on tall, exposed branches.

Where and when can you find Eastern Kingbirds in Pennsylvania? Eastern Kingbirds can be found in open habitats such as fields, meadows, and along the edges of forests. They are most commonly seen during the summer months, from May to August. These birds are active during the day and can be spotted perching on tall trees or flying over open areas.

Eastern Kingbirds Range Map:

Eastern Kingbirds Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Eastern Kingbirds sound like? Eastern Kingbirds have a distinctive call that sounds like a sharp ” kip.” By listening for their call, you can increase your chances of spotting them in the wild.

Eastern Kingbirds Song:

Ken Hall, XC509628. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/509628.

Eastern Kingbirds Call:

Thomas Magarian, XC343541. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/343541.

How can you attract Eastern Kingbirds to your backyard? If you want to attract Eastern Kingbirds to your backyard, consider planting fruit trees or berry bushes. These birds are known to feed on insects, but they also enjoy fruit. You can also provide a water source, such as a bird bath, to attract them.

41. American Robin

American Robin

The American Robin, a familiar sight across the state, provides a delightful spectacle for bird enthusiasts who can frequently observe it in a range of settings throughout Pennsylvania.

  • Wingspan: 12.2” – 15.8”
  • Body Length:  7.9” – 11”
  • Weight: 2.7 – 3 oz
  • Species Name: Turdus migratorius

What do American Robins look like? The American Robin has a distinctive appearance, with a grayish-brown back, reddish-orange breast, and white belly. The male and female of the species look similar, but the male has a darker head and brighter breast. The most distinguished features of the American Robin include its red breast and white eye ring.

Where and when to find American Robins in Pennsylvania? American Robins can be found in a variety of habitats, including forests, parks, and suburban areas. They are most commonly seen during the spring and summer months, but can also be spotted in the fall and winter. They are active during the day and can be seen foraging for food on the ground.

American Robins Range Map:

American Robins
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do American Robins sound like? The American Robin has a distinctive song, which is a series of clear, whistled notes. The song is often described as cheerful and melodic. Bird watchers can listen to the song to help locate the bird.

American Robins Song:

Thomas Magarian, XC524661. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/524661.

American Robins Call:

Thomas Magarian, XC524659. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/524659.

How to attract American Robins to your backyard? To attract American Robins to your backyard, provide a source of water, such as a bird bath, and plant fruit-bearing trees and shrubs. They also enjoy eating mealworms and suet.

42. Mourning Dove

Mourning Dove

The Mourning Dove is a common sight in Pennsylvania, with its soft cooing heard throughout the state.

  • Wingspan: 17.7”
  • Body Length:  9.1” – 13.4”
  • Weight: 3.4 – 6.0 oz (males), 3.0 – 5.5 oz (females)
  • Species Name: Zenaida macroura

What do Mourning Doves look like? These birds have a plump body with a small head and a long, pointed tail. The male has a bluish-gray head and neck, while the female has a more brownish-gray coloring. The most distinguished feature of the Mourning Dove is its soft, cooing call.

Where and when to find Mourning Doves in Pennsylvania? To spot a Mourning Dove in Pennsylvania, look for them in open areas such as fields, parks, and suburban areas. They can be found year-round, but are most active during the early morning and late afternoon. They are also more commonly seen during the warmer months of spring and summer.

Mourning Doves Range Map:

Mourning Doves Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Mourning Doves sound like? To identify the Mourning Dove by sound, listen for their soft, mournful cooing. They often repeat a series of coos in a rhythmic pattern.

Mourning Doves Song:

Lance A. M. Benner, XC354053. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/354053.

Mourning Doves Call:

Lance A. M. Benner, XC545012. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/545012.

How to attract Mourning Doves to your backyard? If you want to attract Mourning Doves to your backyard, provide them with a platform feeder filled with seeds such as millet, sunflower, and cracked corn. They also enjoy drinking from bird baths and may nest in nearby trees or shrubs.

Overall, the Mourning Dove is a peaceful and common bird in Pennsylvania. Keep an eye out for them in open areas and listen for their soothing coos.

43. Northern Cardinal: A Beautiful Sight in Pennsylvania

Northern Cardinal

Pennsylvania is home to a variety of bird species, including the stunning Northern Cardinal. With its vibrant red plumage and distinctive crest, this bird is a favorite among bird watchers. In this article, we’ll explore how to spot this beautiful bird in Pennsylvania.

  • Wingspan: 10” – 12”
  • Body Length:  8.3” – 9.1”
  • Weight:  1.5 – 1.7 oz
  • Species Name: Cardinalis cardinalis

What do the Northern Cardinals look like? The male has a bright red body, black face, and a distinctive crest on its head. The female, on the other hand, has a more muted brownish-red body with a red crest and wings. Both have a short, thick beak and a long tail. The most distinguished features of the Northern Cardinal are its bright red color and crest.

Where and when to find Northern Cardinals in Pennsylvania? To spot a Northern Cardinal in Pennsylvania, head to wooded areas, parks, and gardens. They are also known to visit backyard bird feeders. You can find them year-round, but they are most active during the early morning and late afternoon. They are also more visible during the winter months when the trees have lost their leaves.

Northern Cardinals Range Map:

Northern Cardinals Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Northern Cardinals sound like? The Northern Cardinal has a distinctive song that sounds like “cheer-cheer-cheer” or “birdie-birdie-birdie”.

Northern Cardinals Song:

Giuseppe Speranza, XC468176. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/468176.

Northern Cardinals Call:

Barry Edmonston, XC682547. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/682547.

How to attract Northern Cardinals to your backyard? To attract Northern Cardinals to your backyard, provide them with a variety of seeds, fruits, and nuts. They also enjoy sunflower seeds and safflower seeds. Make sure to provide a water source as well.

44. Rock Pigeon

Rock Pigeon

The Rock Pigeon, also known as the common pigeon, is a familiar sight in Pennsylvania. These birds are found in urban areas, parks, and on city streets.

  • Wingspan: 19.7” – 26.4”
  • Body Length:  11.8” – 14.2”
  • Weight:  9.3 – 13.4 oz
  • Species Name: Columba livia

What do Rock Pigeons look like? These birds have a plump body, small head, and short neck. They have a grayish-blue body with two black bars on their wings. The male has a greenish-purple iridescence on its neck, while the female has a less noticeable iridescence. Their most distinguished feature is their distinctive cooing call.

Where and when to find Rock Pigeons in Pennsylvania? Rock Pigeons can be found in urban areas, parks, and on city streets throughout Pennsylvania. They are most active during the day and can be seen year-round. They prefer to nest on ledges and buildings.

Rock Pigeons Range Map:

Rock Pigeons Range Map:
Credit: https://www.allaboutbirds.org/

What do Rock Pigeons sound like? Their cooing call is a distinctive “coo-coo-coo” sound. They also make a variety of other sounds, including a soft purring noise.

Rock Pigeons Song:

SonoNatura, XC777163. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/777163.

Rock Pigeons Call:

Barry Edmonston, XC796913. Accessible at www.xeno-canto.org/796913.

How to attract Rock Pigeons to your backyard? To attract Rock Pigeons to your backyard, provide them with a platform feeder or scatter seeds on the ground. They prefer to eat seeds and grains.

2 thoughts on “44 Birds Of Pennsylvania (And How To Spot Them!)”

  1. Great job ! I use this page often. I have a gray bird that is slightly smaller than a grackle but doesn’t have a black head so it may not be a catbird. Any help is appreciated. Location NE Pennsylvania. Wooded area.

    Reply
    • Thank you, Dawn! Based on your description, it could be a Tufted Titmouse or a Northern Mockingbird. Both species are common in NE Pennsylvania. I hope this helps! In any case, let us know if you discovered what it was.

      Reply

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